2018 Breakout Sessions

All breakout sessions will run twice so participants can receive the maximum benefit from the conference.  Hear from the organizers on their sessions in the video below, and check out the provided descriptions!



1. Understanding self-perception, self-esteem and empowerment

Description:

Through this interactive session, we will seek to understand how negative self-perception affects self-esteem, and therefore leads to experiences of disempowerment for Asian, Asian American, & Pacific Islander college students. Facilitators will address ways to practically apply a strengths-based approach in turning around negative self-perception and challenging self or societal limitations on our goals and place in the world.

Intended Audience:  30 to 40 Asian, Asian American, Pacific Islander College Students

Location: GCC Area 2


2. Asian American mental health and healthy relationships

Description:

South Asian American experiences with Mental Health, model minority myth, ways to encourage these conversations in the South Asian Community, - A "Think Tank" style workshop on ways we can combat the stigma in our communities, Public health interventions Potential other session on Gender-based Violence/healthy relationships

Intended Audience: 15 to 20 South Asian College Students and Allies

Location: GCC Area 3


3. Returning home: living with intercultural identity and reverse culture shock as international students

Description:

International students are constantly living in-between the cultural differences at home and abroad. In particular, the readjustment into Asian culture can be challenging for students who’ve studied at North American institutions. In this workshop, we will explore some of the challenges international students face such as reverse culture shock and how to become comfortable with intercultural identity. Students will also have opportunities do self-reflection and share insights with each other in small group discussions to design their own approaches to cope with reverse culture shock.

Intended Audience: Pan-Asian international students

Location: Longfellow 320


4. oral history-making

Description:

What exactly do we mean when we say “oral history?” How is oral history-making connected to issues of Asian American history and mental health? Or, as Lin-Manuel Miranda in the musical “Hamilton” asks, “Who tells your story?”

In this breakout session, we will explore these questions and provide a brief introduction to various oral history mediums and examples. We will also break silences and give voice to our personal experiences as Asian Americans via making oral histories of our own. After the initial presentation, the bulk of this breakout session will consist of an introduction to GIF-making and working time for participants to make animated oral histories.

No previous experience necessary; please bring a smartphone or laptop if possible

Intended Audience: 10 to 20 Pan-Asian college students

Location: Longfellow 229


5. breaking the mold: asian, asian americans, and pacific islanders pursuing nontraditional careers

Description:

Coming from a more collectivist family background, it is natural for AAPI students to put our own needs and aspirations second. We have all experienced the traditional career pressures placed on us by our AAPI parents. In this workshop, we will look at the intersection between our nontraditional career aspirations versus the traditional career expectations of our parents' generation. Is it possible to reconcile both? If so, what does that look like?

Attendees will also have the opportunity to hear from a panel of speakers currently pursuing nontraditional careers. Panelists include journalist and reporter Heidi Shin, Berklee College of Music pianist Jade Che, and poet and music producer Ricky Orng. Members will have a chance to reflect on what and why they are doing what they are doing now, conflicting expectations, and where they hope to be next.

Intended Audience:  Pan-Asian college students

Location: Larsen 203


6. Cracking the bamboo ceiling: to be aapi in the workplace

Description:

"Bamboo Ceiling," coined by Jane Hyun in 2005, refers to the challenges Asians and Asian Americans face in obtaining positions of leadership despite excelling both academically and professionally. There are multiple theories for A/AAPI underrepresentation in leadership roles, including cultural differences in communication, cultural values that promote humility, stereotypes that suggest AAPI do not make good leaders, and others.

This session will have two parts. The first part will provide an opportunity for participants to examine their own identity, the aspects of their identity development that make them who they are, and how that influences their relationships. We will then explore how identity might play out in the workplace through a case study and what it means to be an authentic leader. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on their own assumptions and what they learned that can be applicable for their future career paths.

Intended Audience: Pan-Asian college students

Location: Longfellow, Elliot Lyman Room


7. the role of art and mental health in the asian american community

Description:
In this session, we will discuss the ways the arts can aid in expression and healing of mental health. The discussion would start with scientific evidence of how various art forms affect the brain, and flow into personal discussions on the effect of performing on mental health. From providing a way for self-expression, serving as an outlet for emotions, or being an escape from reality, the arts and its intersection with mental health is a booming field that can be readily be implemented into any scenario. Participants will participate in a maker space workshop that provides different modes of art expression, which will then lead into a informal open mic / presentation.

Intended Audience: 25 to 30 Pan-Asian college students

Location: GCC Area 1


8. asian american masculinity

 Andy Riemer

Andy Riemer

 

Description:

This session will discuss the culturization of Asian American men as "weak", "geeky", "sexless", and other stereotypes as a product of systematic oppression.  We will begin by raising awareness of hegemonic masculinity norms and how they may have negatively influenced participants' sense of self.  This discussion of hegemonic and toxic masculinity will lead into a larger conversation around what it means to be an Asian American male in contemporary America.  

Through self-reflection and storytelling, participants will work towards redefining masculinity in order to gain a deeper sense of their own masculinity and identity.  By the end of the session, we hope participants will learn how to practice self-love without overcompensating and falling into toxic masculinity.  

Intended Audience: 15 to 20 Pan-Asian college men and allies

Location: Gutman 303


9. Understanding your racial identity development

Description:

 

Understanding concepts of racial identity development (RID) and reflecting one's current racial identity and its development across time are the core goals of this breakout session.  Facilitators will share their reflections on RIDs and upbringings in order to facilitate an easier understanding of the concept in participants and provide a safe space to share reflections and related experiences.

As we learn how one person's meaning to be Asian American has changed and shaped over time, we will learn that RID is a fluid process for each individual. We will understand that we are continuously constant and stagnant in exploring what being an Asian American means. We will also learn that we share lived experiences that are similar or different with others and, hence, similar or different meanings we attach to our Asian American-ness at the moment. 

Intended Audience: 8 to 10 Pan-Asian college students

Location: Larsen 214


10. the paradox of asian perfectionism

 Janisa Hui

Janisa Hui

 

Description:

This session is designed based on the cognitive model, which encourages participants to understand how they think, how they feel, and what they can do. The session will start with some reflective questions on perfectionism, then we will engage in case studies showing the effects, both positive and negative, of Asian Perfectionism.

Afterwards, the participants are encouraged to share their thoughts regarding their similar experience or the cases.  At the end of the session, the facilitator(s) will help participants change any unhelpful thinking and discuss possible ways to deal with the anxiety or stress that is caused by perfectionism. 

Intended Audience: 8 to 10 Pan-Asian college students

Location: Longfellow 319


11. Making sense of the third culture experience

Description:

Third culture kids (TCKs), and more recently Cross Culture Kids (CCKs), are terms that refer to people who have spent a significant part of their developmental years (0-18) outside their parents’ culture.

In this session, the facilitators, Korean-American siblings who have lived abroad in South America, will briefly share their personal experiences in attempts to discuss developmental and relational themes that are common to the TCK experience, and reveal how similar contexts may lead to disparate outcomes. Participants will also have the opportunity to share their stories and better inform their narratives through collective meaning-making activities.

Intended Audience: 10 to 15 TCK's (typically children of diplomats, military personnel, missionaries, government officials, and business personnel that have lived internationally) and allies

Location: Longfellow 228


12. Narrating Experiences of Integrating Faith, Culture, and Mental Health

 Amie Soo Eun Kang

Amie Soo Eun Kang

 Cathy Kang

Cathy Kang

 Angie Kim

Angie Kim

 Christina Lee

Christina Lee

 Jonathan Pak

Jonathan Pak

 

Description:

This session will provide a platform for students to discuss their experiences of
understanding and integrating their culture, faith, and mental health. How do you
understand mental health through your faith and through a cultural lens? In what
ways has your faith and cultural values aligned and differed?

This session will be led by a group including HGSE alumni who represent Mustard Seed Generation, a Christian organization that aims to foster the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual growth of Asian Americans by reconciling individuals and families through
the church.

Intended Audience: 25 to 30 Pan-Asian college students

Location: Gutman G05


13. The Art of Listening and Receiving Feedback 倾听与接受反馈的艺术

 Paul Tian

Paul Tian

 Ziyi Xiu

Ziyi Xiu

 

Description:

Are you curious to learn some listening techniques to assist with your personal life, study and work? How can these skills help you gain personal growth and have more satisfying relationships? Come to this special Chinese-only session to hear from a HGSE alumna and a mental health counselor about skills on listening and receiving feedback. Participants will also have opportunities to share insights with each other in small group discussions and interact with speakers.

您想了解更多的倾听技巧以帮助您的生活、学习与工作么? 如何通过倾听来促进自我成长并拥有更好的人际关系呢? 参加这个特别的中文座谈会,您将从一位哈佛校友和一位心理咨询师那里了解到一些关于倾听和接受反馈的技巧。参与者有机会在小组讨论中表达自己的观点并与演讲者互动。

Intended Audience: 10 to 20 Chinese Speaking Students

Location: Longfellow 207


14. At the intersection of pride and shame: advocacy and support for lgbtq & aapi young adults

 Dr. Matt Poon

Dr. Matt Poon

 Cindy Wong

Cindy Wong

 

Description:

This interactive workshop aims to highlight the unique challenges that arise for young adults who have intersecting oppressed identities, and how CIS and Hetero peers can be effective allies on campus and beyond.

Intended Audience: Pan-Asian College Students

Location: Larsen G01